Is Anxiety an Indicator of Alzheimer’s?

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Anxiety is a common problem in people who have Alzheimer’s disease. It’s a behavioral symptom that can be difficult to deal with. While anxiety can be caused by Alzheimer’s, a new study indicates that having anxiety is also a risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Study Shows Anxiety Could Lead to Alzheimer’s Disease

Home Care Nazareth PA - Is Anxiety an Indicator of Alzheimer’s?

Home Care Nazareth PA – Is Anxiety an Indicator of Alzheimer’s?

The study took place at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Massachusetts. Researchers observed 270 people who did not have cognitive problems. The participants were between the ages of 62 and 90. At the start of the study, the researchers conducted tests to determine the level of beta-amyloid in each person’s brain. Beta-amyloids are a protein that are the building blocks of the plaques people with Alzheimer’s develop in their brains.

The study lasted for five years. During that time, the participants took tests that measured different things, including their levels of anxiety. At the end of the study, researchers concluded that the people who had higher levels of anxiety also had higher levels of beta-amyloid.

Although the study does not prove that anxiety causes Alzheimer’s, it does suggest that it’s a good idea to keep an eye on older adults with anxiety. In fact, if your aging relative seems to be increasingly anxious, it might be wise to see a doctor.

Alzheimer’s Signs to Watch For

When a person is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s they will usually exhibit some signs of the disease. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, some of the signs that may indicate an older adult has the disease are:

  • Memory loss that begins to affect their daily life.
  • Trouble doing tasks that once came easily.
  • Being confused about where they are or the passage of time.
  • Problems following a plan or steps to complete a task.
  • Difficulty finding the right words or following a conversation.
  • Making poor decisions or lapses in judgement.
  • Withdrawing from people or activities they once enjoyed.

 

How Home Care Can Help

If your aging relative is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, it’s a good idea to begin planning early for their care in the later stages. Home care can be a great asset to families dealing with Alzheimer’s, allowing family caregivers to maintain as much of their normal lives as possible. Home care providers can stay with the older adult while family caregivers are at work or engaged in other activities. Knowing a home care provider is keeping the person safe relieves some of the stress and worry, making life better for both the older adult and the people who care about them.

Sources:  https://www.aarp.org/health/brain-health/info-2018/alzheimers-anxiety-link-fd.html

https://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-dementia-agitation-anxiety.asp

https://www.alz.org/10-signs-symptoms-alzheimers-dementia.asp

If you or an aging loved one are in need of Home Care Services in Nazareth PA or the surrounding areas, contact the caring professionals at Extended Family Care of Allentown. Call today at (610) 200-6097.

Carole Chiego

Carole Chiego became a member of the Extended Family Care team in January, 2008. Prior to her role as the Administrator of the Allentown office, she was the Area Director of Operations for a home care company in East Orange, New Jersey. Carole’s extensive experience in home care spans over 17 years. Her work ethic and desire to succeed in the industry are evident in her advancement within the field ranging from Scheduling Coordinator to Medical Records Coordinator to Branch Manager and finally to Administrator and Area Director. She believes assuming these roles has made her a more effective manager.

Carole gained most of her formal managerial training by attending Pennsylvania State University in pursuit of her degree in Health Policy and Administration. She attributes her informal training to have been acquired on a more personal level. Carole understands first-hand what families may experience when allowing a home care provider access to their home while providing care to their loved one. She was a caregiver for two of her grandparents until their passing and believes in the importance of allowing family members the opportunity to remain in the comfort of home if they so desire. Carole is also the mother of a child with multiple medical conditions who requires nursing services in the home. It is because of her personal experiences that Carole understands first-hand how important it is to manage a quality, high-integrity home care agency in which clients and families can place their trust and be confident they are receiving the best care possible. Carole also believes in the importance of giving back to the community. Therefore, she volunteers and spear-heads fundraising activities for a variety of charitable and professional organizations, namely the Pennsylvania Home Care Association, Autism Speaks and Avengers Baseball, Inc.

Carole, a resident of Lehigh County, is married and has 2 children. In her free time, she is the “team mom” for her son’s tournament baseball team, enjoys cooking, spending time with her family and friends, and is an avid NY Giants, NY Yankees and Penn State football fan. Carol is a verified Google Author
About the author: Carole Chiego
Carole Chiego became a member of the Extended Family Care team in January, 2008. Prior to her role as the Administrator of the Allentown office, she was the Area Director of Operations for a home care company in East Orange, New Jersey. Carole’s extensive experience in home care spans over 17 years. Her work ethic and desire to succeed in the industry are evident in her advancement within the field ranging from Scheduling Coordinator to Medical Records Coordinator to Branch Manager and finally to Administrator and Area Director. She believes assuming these roles has made her a more effective manager. Carole gained most of her formal managerial training by attending Pennsylvania State University in pursuit of her degree in Health Policy and Administration. She attributes her informal training to have been acquired on a more personal level. Carole understands first-hand what families may experience when allowing a home care provider access to their home while providing care to their loved one. She was a caregiver for two of her grandparents until their passing and believes in the importance of allowing family members the opportunity to remain in the comfort of home if they so desire. Carole is also the mother of a child with multiple medical conditions who requires nursing services in the home. It is because of her personal experiences that Carole understands first-hand how important it is to manage a quality, high-integrity home care agency in which clients and families can place their trust and be confident they are receiving the best care possible. Carole also believes in the importance of giving back to the community. Therefore, she volunteers and spear-heads fundraising activities for a variety of charitable and professional organizations, namely the Pennsylvania Home Care Association, Autism Speaks and Avengers Baseball, Inc. Carole, a resident of Lehigh County, is married and has 2 children. In her free time, she is the “team mom” for her son’s tournament baseball team, enjoys cooking, spending time with her family and friends, and is an avid NY Giants, NY Yankees and Penn State football fan. Carol is a verified Google Author