FAQ’s About Seasonal Affective Disorder in Seniors

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Senior Care Catasauqua PA - FAQ's About Seasonal Affective Disorder in Seniors

Senior Care Catasauqua PA – FAQ’s About Seasonal Affective Disorder in Seniors

You may have heard of someone having the winter blues, but when people experience depression related to the winter months, it might really be a medical condition known as Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD. Elderly adults are particularly susceptible to SAD, especially those that struggle with physical limitations and depend on family members and senior care providers for assistance.

Family caregivers should learn how to spot the signs of SAD in their elderly relatives so they can take steps to remedy the situation and boost their loved one’s quality of life during winter.

Here are some frequently asked questions about SAD and elderly adults:

Q: What exactly is Seasonal Affective Disorder?

A: SAD is a form of depression that is triggered by shorter winter days and usually lasts from late fall to early spring. It generally recurs every year, often with different intensity. Also known as seasonal depression or winter blues, SAD is a medically recognized as a mental health condition that is similar to clinical depression.

Q: What are the symptoms of SAD in seniors?

A: The symptoms for SAD in seniors includes insomnia, lethargy, irritability, mood swings, feelings of hopelessness or guilt, undereating or overeating, and thoughts of suicide. Too many of the symptoms mimic other age-related conditions, such as mononucleosis, hypothyroidism, dementia, and more. Therefore, it may be difficult for family caregivers and home care providers to recognize that SAD is an issue.

Q: What causes SAD in elderly adults?

A: While the exact causes behind SAD are unclear, there are certainly contributing circumstances that increase the likelihood and risk for someone to develop it. It is more frequent in women and is more common in areas with a higher latitude, and therefore less sunlight in the winter months. Medical experts have linked the decrease in sunlight to changes in the body’s natural functions and brain chemicals.

Q: Why are seniors at a high risk for SAD?

A: Elderly adults are already at a higher risk for depression due to age plus life circumstances. Seniors with limited mobility may not be able to engage in the type of healthy lifestyle that reduces the risk of depression. They are less likely to get regular exercise, sleep and healthy meals. Also, seniors that depend on family caregivers or senior care providers are often not mobile enough to get outdoors much, leading to infrequent exposure to natural light.

Q: How is SAD treated in seniors?

A: The good news is that SAD is quite treatable and there are several different combinations that work for most seniors. Of course, family caregivers and home care providers should help the elderly person practice good lifestyle habits with diet, exercise and sleep. Increased exposure to sunlight means more outings, and special light boxes can help when inside. Therapy and antidepressants can do a lot of good for moderate to serious cases.

If you or a loved one are in need of Senior Care Services in Catasauqua PA or the surrounding areas, contact the caring professionals at Extended Family Care of Allentown. Call today at (610) 200-6097. 

Carole Chiego

Carole Chiego became a member of the Extended Family Care team in January, 2008. Prior to her role as the Administrator of the Allentown office, she was the Area Director of Operations for a home care company in East Orange, New Jersey. Carole’s extensive experience in home care spans over 17 years. Her work ethic and desire to succeed in the industry are evident in her advancement within the field ranging from Scheduling Coordinator to Medical Records Coordinator to Branch Manager and finally to Administrator and Area Director. She believes assuming these roles has made her a more effective manager.

Carole gained most of her formal managerial training by attending Pennsylvania State University in pursuit of her degree in Health Policy and Administration. She attributes her informal training to have been acquired on a more personal level. Carole understands first-hand what families may experience when allowing a home care provider access to their home while providing care to their loved one. She was a caregiver for two of her grandparents until their passing and believes in the importance of allowing family members the opportunity to remain in the comfort of home if they so desire. Carole is also the mother of a child with multiple medical conditions who requires nursing services in the home. It is because of her personal experiences that Carole understands first-hand how important it is to manage a quality, high-integrity home care agency in which clients and families can place their trust and be confident they are receiving the best care possible. Carole also believes in the importance of giving back to the community. Therefore, she volunteers and spear-heads fundraising activities for a variety of charitable and professional organizations, namely the Pennsylvania Home Care Association, Autism Speaks and Avengers Baseball, Inc.

Carole, a resident of Lehigh County, is married and has 2 children. In her free time, she is the “team mom” for her son’s tournament baseball team, enjoys cooking, spending time with her family and friends, and is an avid NY Giants, NY Yankees and Penn State football fan. Carol is a verified Google Author

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About the author: Carole Chiego
Carole Chiego became a member of the Extended Family Care team in January, 2008. Prior to her role as the Administrator of the Allentown office, she was the Area Director of Operations for a home care company in East Orange, New Jersey. Carole’s extensive experience in home care spans over 17 years. Her work ethic and desire to succeed in the industry are evident in her advancement within the field ranging from Scheduling Coordinator to Medical Records Coordinator to Branch Manager and finally to Administrator and Area Director. She believes assuming these roles has made her a more effective manager. Carole gained most of her formal managerial training by attending Pennsylvania State University in pursuit of her degree in Health Policy and Administration. She attributes her informal training to have been acquired on a more personal level. Carole understands first-hand what families may experience when allowing a home care provider access to their home while providing care to their loved one. She was a caregiver for two of her grandparents until their passing and believes in the importance of allowing family members the opportunity to remain in the comfort of home if they so desire. Carole is also the mother of a child with multiple medical conditions who requires nursing services in the home. It is because of her personal experiences that Carole understands first-hand how important it is to manage a quality, high-integrity home care agency in which clients and families can place their trust and be confident they are receiving the best care possible. Carole also believes in the importance of giving back to the community. Therefore, she volunteers and spear-heads fundraising activities for a variety of charitable and professional organizations, namely the Pennsylvania Home Care Association, Autism Speaks and Avengers Baseball, Inc. Carole, a resident of Lehigh County, is married and has 2 children. In her free time, she is the “team mom” for her son’s tournament baseball team, enjoys cooking, spending time with her family and friends, and is an avid NY Giants, NY Yankees and Penn State football fan. Carol is a verified Google Author